UC Berkeley Institute of Personality and Social Research

Colloquia

  • Wed, Oct 3, 2018, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    2121 Berkeley Way, Room 1104

    Being Real

    Presenter: Chris Hopwood, Associate Professor, UC Davis

    Although the concept of authenticity has been an enduring interest among philosophers, theorists, and psychological scientists, no consensual definition has been achieved. Points of contrast across theories include whether authenticity is a trait or a state, whether it is general or role-specific, the degree to which it encompasses internal experiences and external behaviors, and the extent to …

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  • Wed, Oct 17, 2018, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    2121 Berkeley Way, Room 1104

    Emotionally Unpredictable Leaders Harm Team Performance Because They Create Intra-team Power Struggles

    Presenter: Lindred Greer, Associate Professor, Stanford Graduate School of Business

    Prior research demonstrates that the discrete emotional displays of leaders, such as anger and happiness, send social information to followers that helps to direct team members’ focus, understanding of the situation, and motivation, boosting team performance. We argue that a key assumption underlying this research is that leaders’ emotions are informative to followers, sending …

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  • Wed, Sep 12, 2018, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    2121 Berkeley Way, Room 1104

    Our Emotions, Our Bodies, Ourselves: Sources of Variability in our Affective Responses to the World

    Presenter: Erika Siegel, Postdoctoral Fellow, UC San Francisco

    Traditional theories about emotion posit that variation in responses to evocative stimuli is epiphenomenal, or unrelated, to the experience of emotion. In this talk, I present data from a meta-analysis on bodily responses during emotion from which I will argue that variation in responses is pervasive and normative and that understanding the full scope of human emotion requires …

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  • Wed, Sep 5, 2018, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    2121 Berkeley Way, Room 1104

    Multilevel Modeling: What it is, when you need it (and when you don't), and 4 important questions to ask every time you use it

    Presenter: Amie Gordon, Postdoctoral Fellow, UC San Francisco

    Multilevel modeling (MLM) is everywhere these days. Reviewers are increasingly asking people to use this advanced approach to statistics and there are more and more online calculators devoted to helping people run MLM analyses. But MLM requires making a lot of choices, and without a clear understanding of what MLM is, it is easy to make mistakes. In this one hour whirlwind tour …

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  • Wed, May 9, 2018, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    A new perspective on the social functions of emotions: Gratitude and the witnessing effect

    Presenter: Christopher Oveis, Assistant Professor, UC San Diego

    We propose a novel theoretical and empirical approach to studying group-level social functions of emotions and use it to make new predictions about social consequences of gratitude. Here, we document the witnessing effect: In social groups, emotional expressions are often observed by 3rd party witnesses—family members, co-workers, friends, and neighbors. Emotional expressions coordinate …

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  • Wed, May 2, 2018, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    Scabs: The Social Suppression of Labor Supply

    Presenter: Supreet Kaur, Assistant Professor of Economics, UC Berkeley

    A distinguishing feature of the labor market is social interaction among co-workers---providing the ingredients for social norms to develop and constrain behavior. We use a field experiment to test whether social norms against accepting wage cuts distort workers' labor supply during periods of unemployment. We partner with 183 existing employers, who offer jobs to 502 randomly-selected …

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  • Wed, Apr 25, 2018, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    Message Intended is Not Message Received: Shame, Stigma, and Disengagement in the Academic Probation Notification Process

    Presenter: Shannon Brady, Postdoctoral Scholar, Stanford University

    An important institutional and societal dilemma is how to notify people when they are not meeting performance or community standards without undermining their motivation and efforts to do so. Focusing on the context of college students being placed on academic probation, I find that college administrators overwhelmingly intend probation to be helpful to and motivating for students but that …

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