UC Berkeley Institute of Personality and Social Research

Events

Berkeley Film &Amp; Media Seminar Archive


  • Wed, Feb 15, 2017, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    Polluting Black Space

    Presenter: Courtney Bonam, Assistant Professor, University of Illinois, Chicago

    Physical space has been and remains a tool for maintaining racial hierarchy, resulting in a range of different kinds of physical spaces being imbued with racial meaning (e.g., Black inner-cities, White suburbs). Accordingly, racial stereotype content extends beyond personal attributes to physical space characteristics (e.g., Black areas are impoverished, White areas are wealthy). The mere …

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  • Wed, Feb 8, 2017, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    Choosing Empathy

    Presenter: Jamil Zaki, Assistant Professor, Stanford University

    Empathy--people's ability to share and understand each other's emotions--is a powerful social force, but can collapse when it is most needed, for instance during intergroup conflicts. Many theories of empathy hold that it occurs automatically, something like an emotional reflex.  If this is the case, then its limits might be unavoidable. In this talk, I will lay out an alternative …

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  • Wed, Jan 25, 2017, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    The effects of intranasal oxytocin on mentalization in individuals with and without schizophrenia

    Presenter: Joshua Woolley, Assistant Professor, UC San Francisco

    There is growing interest in the use of intranasal oxytocin administration to alter social behavior and functioning in healthy and patient populations. In particular, there is growing excitement that oxytocin may be a novel approach for treatment of social cognitive deficits in schizophrenia, which are important causes of worse clinical, functional, and occupational outcomes. However, there is …

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  • Wed, Dec 7, 2016, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    When Can We Predict Romantic Outcomes?

    Presenter: Paul W. Eastwick, Associate Professor, UC Davis

    Romantic relationships profoundly impact people’s health and well-being. Yet it remains unclear if and when it is possible to predict a priori how relationship experiences will unfold and evolve over time: When can we determine whether two people will (a) want to form a relationship in the first place and (b) be happy or miserable together? This talk will review findings and theories …

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  • Fri, Nov 18, 2016, 2:15 pm to 3:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    Emotional acculturation

    Presenter: Batja Mesquita, Professor | Center for Social and Cultural Psychology | University of Leuven

    People learn to have emotions that fit the values central to their own culture and that benefit the types of relationships that are valued in that culture. By sharing the emotions of the culture, individuals align themselves –often unwittingly-- with the values of their groups and cultures. Thus, cultural variations in emotional phenomena are best understood as a function of culturally …

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  • Wed, Nov 16, 2016, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    Truman Capote and the IPAR Creative Writers Project

    Presenter: Panel Discussion

    In 1958, the young American writer Truman Capote came to Berkeley to participate in a study of creative writers being conducted at the Institute of Personality Assessment and Research (IPAR). As part of this study, he completed a number of psychological tests, was observed participating in group activities, and was interviewed by the IPAR staff. In our ongoing efforts to digitize and preserve …

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  • Wed, Nov 9, 2016, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    Neural mechanisms underlying Mind Wandering

    Presenter: Julia Kam, Postdoctoral Scholar, Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute

    Mind wandering is a fundamental cognitive phenomenon in which attention is directed inward to one’s internal milieu. This quintessential human experience is associated with both adaptive values as well as adverse outcomes. Although we spend up to half our waking hours mind wandering, very little is known about how our brain enables us to maintain a thought. In this talk, I will …

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  • Wed, Nov 2, 2016, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    Trump’s Sealed Hairspray––Plus Information Shown to Boost Conservatives’ and Liberals’ Acceptance of Human-Caused Global Warming

    Presenter: Michael Ranney, Professor, UC Berkeley Graduate School of Education

    Essentially, no Americans (i.e., 0% of non-specialists) can accurately explain global warming’s basic mechanism at a 35-word prose level––or even at a 13-word haiku level.  Some “stasis” researchers, though, mistakenly believe that scientific information cannot yield more normative U.S. climate change attitudes. Berkeley’s Reasoning Research Group has …

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  • Wed, Oct 19, 2016, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    Bearing Witness: Police Brutality as Vicarious Stigma

    Presenter: Cheryl Kaiser, Professor, University of Washington

    Does bearing witness to police brutality targeting racial minorities have downstream consequences for physiological and social identity-related processes among African Americans and White Americans?  I will discuss a multi-method behavioral laboratory study in which African Americans and White Americans were randomly assigned to deliver a speech on either media coverage of police …

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  • Wed, Oct 12, 2016, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    When will social comparisons discourage, encourage, or have no impact?

    Presenter: Todd Rogers, Associate Professor, Harvard Kennedy School

    I will discuss three field research projects examining when and why social comparison information affects behavior. This research will involve home energy efficiency, student success in a massive open online course, and student attendance in a large urban school district. Each project generates a different response to social comparison: from motivation to conform, to discouragement …

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  • Wed, Oct 5, 2016, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    Emotion regulation: elucidating brain, behavioral and clinical features

    Presenter: Philippe Goldin, Assistant Professor, UC Davis

    The ability to skillfully modulate emotions is an essential feature of mental and physical health. In this talk, I will share research on the brain and behavioral features of a variety of different emotion regulation strategies and discuss how these strategies compare and differ in healthy adults and adults with social anxiety disorder. Philippe Goldin is an Assistant Professor at the …

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  • Wed, Sep 28, 2016, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    Definitely Maybe: The role of (un)certainty in decision-making

    Presenter: Uma Karmarkar, Assistant Professor, Harvard Business School

    Many of our daily decisions involve some degree of uncertainty, arising from incomplete or inconclusive information. For example, we can be unsure of whether a new restaurant’s food will fit our tastes, or whether we will win a gamble, even if we know something about the odds. However, people often find such ambiguity aversive, preferring to have conclusive evidence, …

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  • Fri, Sep 23, 2016, 3:00 pm to 4:30 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    Take Pride: Why the Deadliest Sin Holds the Secret to Human Success

    Presenter: Jessica L. Tracy, Professor, University of British Columbia

    Why did Paul Gauguin abandon middle-class life to follow the path of a starving artist? What inspired Bill Gates to give away so much of his hard-won fortune? How has Donald Trump succeeded so excessively, when his winning style could easily be his greatest liability? As the renowned emotion researcher Jessica Tracy reveals in Take Pride, each of these superachievers has been motivated by …

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  • Wed, Sep 14, 2016, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    A Journey to the Ends of Emotion Regulation

    Presenter: Maya Tamir, Associate Professor, The Hebrew University

    Emotion regulation involves using emotion regulation strategies (i.e., means) to achieve desired emotional states (i.e., ends). This talk will focus on such desired emotional states. First, I will examine why people want to experience certain emotional states. Second, I will propose that the emotions people want to experience influence how they regulate their emotions, how they feel and how …

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  • Wed, Aug 31, 2016, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    The Invisible Hand of Homophily

    Presenter: Drew Jacoby-Senghor, Assistant Professor, Haas School of Business

    Despite the best intentions of both individuals and institutions, homogeneity within social networks stubbornly persists, profoundly shaping individuals’ social realities, from the interactions one has to the opportunities one is afforded. I explore how unconscious intergroup biases act as an invisible hand perpetuating homogeneous networks that, in turn, threaten to reify …

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