UC Berkeley Institute of Personality and Social Research

Events

Berkeley Film &Amp; Media Seminar Archive


  • Wed, Dec 6, 2017, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    Research on Policing: Bias, Discretion, and Policy

    Presenter: Jack Glaser, Professor, Goldman School of Public Policy, UC Berkeley

    Jack Glaser will describe the research he and his colleagues are conducting on racial bias in policing. This will include discussion of the relevant psychological research that helps to explain how racial discrimination occurs and analysis of policing data elucidating racial disparities.  Glaser will discuss his efforts with the Center for Policing Equity to build the National …

    More

  • Wed, Nov 15, 2017, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    From Egosystem to Ecosystem: Motivations of the Self in Social Relationships

    Presenter: Jennifer Crocker, Professor, Ohio State University

    I propose that in their social interactions, people may be energized by egosystem motivation in which they are preoccupied with proving their own worth and value to themselves and others, or by ecosystem motivation in which they strive to be constructive and supportive of people and things they care about beyond themselves. These two motivational systems, I suggest, are scaffolded onto evolved …

    More

  • Wed, Nov 8, 2017, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    Experience Effects -- How Personal Lifetime Experiences Affect Financial Investment and Risk Attitudes

    Presenter: Ulrike Malmendier, Professor, UC Berkeley

    Ulrike Malmendier received her PhD in Business Economics from Harvard University in 2002, and her PhD in Law (summa cum laude) from the University of Bonn in 2000. She joined Berkeley in 2006 as an Assistant Professor, after having been at Stanford as Assistant Professor of Finance since 2002. She also is a research associate at NBER (Corporate Finance and Labor Economics) and a faculty …

    More

  • Wed, Nov 1, 2017, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    Climate change advocacy and ad hominem attacks

    Presenter: Shahzeen Attari, Assistant Professor, Indiana University Bloomington

    Debates about climate change often involve ad hominem attacks. Each side is accused of insincerity, of merely serving special interests. In particular, those who advocate policies to promote energy conservation or otherwise reduce CO2 emissions can be challenged if their personal energy use appears to be high. Our studies indicate that an attack based on high personal …

    More

  • Wed, Oct 18, 2017, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    Self-Interest versus Other-Focus: Navigating the Self-Other Tradeoff in Interpersonal Relationships

    Presenter: Amie Gordon, Postdoctoral Fellow, UC San Francisco

    Relationships underscore every aspect of our lives, influencing the health and well-being of individuals, groups and organizations. One of the fundamental challenges in interpersonal relationships is balancing self-interest with the needs of another person. In this talk, I draw upon social, personality, and health psychology to investigate the factors that shape this self-other tradeoff with …

    More

  • Wed, Oct 18, 2017, 11:10 am to 12:00 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    The Harm in Harmony: Covert Competition and Ingroup Suspicion in East Asian Cultures

    Presenter: Michael Morris, Professor, Columbia University

    A prominent theme in East-West cultural comparisons is that East Asian social interactions are characterized by harmony. But is this merely the surface? We propose that Easterners compete with ingroup members but tend to do so covertly to avoid risking relationships. Further we propose that, under many conditions, they suspect their peers are up to the same. We investigated this underside of …

    More

  • Wed, Oct 11, 2017, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    How social and personality psychologists can be assets to assessment and selection teams at Google

    Presenter: Drs. Maria Arboleda (Scaled Assessments Manager - Hiring Innovation) and Dana Landis (Head of Leadership Assessment and Effectiveness) at Google

    Drs. Maria Arboleda and Dana Landis will address a series of applied methods, training, and career focused questions crowd-sourced from Social-Personality Area graduate students.

    More

  • Wed, Oct 4, 2017, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    The Self in Social Inference: Antecedents and Consequences of Perspective Taking

    Presenter: Andrew Todd, Assistant Professor, UC Davis

    The ability to intuit what other people are thinking and feeling with some degree of accuracy is essential for effective communication and social coordination, making it important to understand both the factors that give rise to and the consequences that follow from perspective taking. In this talk, I’ll provide an overview of a program of research that examines the role of the self as …

    More

  • Wed, Sep 20, 2017, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    Inspiration in the writer-reader encounter: Creativity, transmission, contagion, and personality similarity

    Presenter: Todd Thrash, Professor, College of William & Mary

    Inspiration is a motivational state in which an individual feels compelled to transmit, actualize, or express ideas. In this colloquium I present a series of studies of the role of inspiration in the writer-reader encounter. Key findings include the following: (a) Writer inspiration predicts the creativity of the resulting text, whereas writer effort tends to be a poor predictor. (b) …

    More

  • Wed, Sep 13, 2017, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    Information Seeding and Knowledge Production in Online Communities: Evidence from OpenStreetMap

    Presenter: Abhishek Nagaraj, Assistant Professor, Haas School of Business

    Does seeding online communities with baseline information spur contributor activity and follow-on knowledge production? I shed light on this question by examining data from OpenStreetMap, a Wikipedia-style, digital map-making community that was seeded by the US Census TIGER map at its inception. I estimate the causal effects of information seeding on OpenStreetMap by leveraging a novel dataset …

    More

  • Wed, Sep 6, 2017, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    The Vicarious Construal Effect: Seeing and Experiencing the World Through Different Eyes

    Presenter: Clayton Critcher, Associate Professor, Haas School of Business

    That two individuals can be exposed to the same stimulus and experience it differently speaks to the power of construal. People’s construals are shaped by their idiosyncratic attitudes, belief systems, and personal histories. As a result, simple delights for children often become uninspiring bores for adults. In this talk, I consider whether people can actively try on construals and …

    More

  • Wed, Aug 30, 2017, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    The Psychology of Brokerage

    Presenter: Nir Halevy, Associate Professor, Stanford University Graduate School of Business

    Third parties often shape dyadic interactions and relationships. Building on interdependence theory as an organizing conceptual framework, the current research explores when, why, and how third parties intervene in others' interactions, and illuminates previously unidentified similarities and differences between distinct types of third party influence.

    More

  • Wed, Aug 23, 2017, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    The neural substrates of anxious temperament in non-human primates

    Presenter: Andrew Fox, Assistant Professor, UC Davis

    An extremely anxious temperament early in life is a risk factor for the later development of anxiety, depressive, and substance abuse disorders. Children with an extremely anxious temperament (AT), react to novelty with increased behavioral inhibition and increased levels of physiological arousal. Using a well-validated non-human primate model of AT, our group has been investigating the …

    More

  • Wed, May 3, 2017, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    Two axes of subordination: How immigration shapes racial dynamics in the U.S.

    Presenter: Sapna Cheryan, Associate Professor, University of Washington

    The study of racial prejudice in psychology developed primarily based on research studying African Americans and Whites. The recent precipitated growth of Latinos and Asian Americans in the United States underscores the need for a framework that integrates more groups.  The current work proposes that racial and ethnic minority groups are disadvantaged along two distinct dimensions …

    More

  • Wed, Apr 19, 2017, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    Power Analysis and Meta-Analysis are Falsely Reassuring Solutions for Concerns about Statistical Power

    Presenter: Leif Nelson, Professor, Haas School of Business

    Transparency, disclosure, and preregistration have revealed that some statistically underpowered studies may be propped up by selective reporting and p-hacking. Conscientious researchers therefore have renewed investment in statistical power. One approach is to conduct traditional power analysis to correctly set the sample size. I argue that this tool is not helpful and often biased toward …

    More