UC Berkeley Institute of Personality and Social Research

Events

Berkeley Film &Amp; Media Seminar Archive


  • Wed, Feb 20, 2019, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    2121 Berkeley Way, Room 1104

    Values alignment: An alternative to pragmatic appeals for behavior change

    Presenter: Christopher J. Bryan, Assistant Professor, Booth School of Business, University of Chicago

    The science of behavior change has become an increasingly important frontier in the quest to improve human health and well-being. Recognition of this is now widespread in the scientific community, but the science of behavior change—the development of effective, empirically-validated techniques for producing lasting, internalized motivation for the behavioral choices people know they …

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  • Wed, Feb 13, 2019, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    2121 Berkeley Way, Room 1104

    Do Bullies Win? A Critical Look at the Dominance Theory of Social Hierarchy

    Presenter: Cameron Anderson, Professor, BerkeleyHaas

    All too commonly, we see aggressive, bullying individuals in positions of influence and power. The frequency with which these individuals occupy the top echelon begs the question: does aggression and bullying help people rise to the top of social hierarchies? According to dominance theory, the answer is “yes”: individuals can attain influence by intimidating others and forcing them …

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  • Wed, Jan 23, 2019, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    2121 Berkeley Way, Room 1104

    Principles and mechanisms of Mutual Understanding

    Presenter: Arjen Stolks, Postdoctoral Fellow, UC Berkeley and the Donders Institute

    Intuitively, humans understand one another because they share the same set of communicative signals such as words and gestures. However, that intuition neglects the extreme flexibility with which we employ our communicative signals in everyday social interaction. Neither can it account for our evolutionarily unique ability to instantly reach joint meaning of new signals in the first place. In …

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  • Wed, Nov 14, 2018, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    2121 Berkeley Way, Room 1104

    The Epistemology of Overconfidence: On the difficulty of being both wrong and knowing it

    Presenter: Don Moore, Professor, BerkeleyHaas

    In this talk, I begin by distinguishing three forms of overconfidence: overestimation, overplacement, and overprecision. Of these, overprecision (inflated confidence in the accuracy of our knowledge or predictions) is the most robust and least understood. I document its role in self-assessment, test performance, and macroeconomic forecasts. This leads to an epistemological …

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  • Wed, Nov 7, 2018, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    2121 Berkeley Way, Room 1104

    Their pain, our pleasure

    Presenter: Mina Cikara, Assistant Professor, Harvard University

    If humans are innately good, cooperative, fair, and averse to harming one another, why does widespread intergroup conflict persist? Several factors contribute to fomenting hostility between groups; in my talk I will focus on the role of pleasure in response to out-group pain. People who identify strongly with their social groups frequently experience pleasure when they observe threatening …

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  • Wed, Oct 24, 2018, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    2121 Berkeley Way, Room 1104

    You Want How Much?! Perceptions of Extreme First Offers and The Men and Women Who Make Them

    Presenter: Margaret Lee, Postdoctoral Scholar, Center for Equity, Gender, and Leadership, Haas School of Business

    Much research has robustly shown that individuals benefit from making a first offer in negotiations and has advocated high offers for sellers and low offers for buyers. However, little research has considered how extreme (unreasonably high for sellers and unreasonably low for buyers) offers, as well as the negotiators who make them, are perceived. Experiment 1 found that, compared to moderate …

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  • Wed, Oct 17, 2018, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    2121 Berkeley Way, Room 1104

    Emotionally Unpredictable Leaders Harm Team Performance Because They Create Intra-team Power Struggles

    Presenter: Lindred Greer, Associate Professor, Stanford Graduate School of Business

    Prior research demonstrates that the discrete emotional displays of leaders, such as anger and happiness, send social information to followers that helps to direct team members’ focus, understanding of the situation, and motivation, boosting team performance. We argue that a key assumption underlying this research is that leaders’ emotions are informative to followers, sending …

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  • Wed, Oct 10, 2018, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    2121 Berkeley Way, Room 1104

    Sleepless and alone: How does sleep loss affect our social life?

    Presenter: Eti Ben Simon, Postdoctoral Fellow, The Center for Human Sleep Research, UC Berkeley

    Loneliness is a growing public health epidemic, reliably increasing mortality and morbidity risks in socially isolated individuals. A potential factor linking loneliness to poor health is disturbed sleep. Both lonely individuals as well as socially isolated animals suffer from worse sleep quality compared to socially connected controls. Focusing on the importance of sleep in modulating social …

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  • Wed, Oct 3, 2018, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    2121 Berkeley Way, Room 1104

    Being Real

    Presenter: Chris Hopwood, Associate Professor, UC Davis

    Although the concept of authenticity has been an enduring interest among philosophers, theorists, and psychological scientists, no consensual definition has been achieved. Points of contrast across theories include whether authenticity is a trait or a state, whether it is general or role-specific, the degree to which it encompasses internal experiences and external behaviors, and the extent to …

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  • Wed, Sep 12, 2018, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    2121 Berkeley Way, Room 1104

    Our Emotions, Our Bodies, Ourselves: Sources of Variability in our Affective Responses to the World

    Presenter: Erika Siegel, Postdoctoral Fellow, UC San Francisco

    Traditional theories about emotion posit that variation in responses to evocative stimuli is epiphenomenal, or unrelated, to the experience of emotion. In this talk, I present data from a meta-analysis on bodily responses during emotion from which I will argue that variation in responses is pervasive and normative and that understanding the full scope of human emotion requires …

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  • Wed, Sep 5, 2018, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    2121 Berkeley Way, Room 1104

    Multilevel Modeling: What it is, when you need it (and when you don't), and 4 important questions to ask every time you use it

    Presenter: Amie Gordon, Postdoctoral Fellow, UC San Francisco

    Multilevel modeling (MLM) is everywhere these days. Reviewers are increasingly asking people to use this advanced approach to statistics and there are more and more online calculators devoted to helping people run MLM analyses. But MLM requires making a lot of choices, and without a clear understanding of what MLM is, it is easy to make mistakes. In this one hour whirlwind tour …

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  • Sat, Aug 4, 2018, 10:30 am to 4:00 pm

    2121 Berkeley Way

    Bay Area Training Program in Affective Science - Summer Workshop

    The Bay Area Training Program in Affective Science has a day-long workshop each summer at which trainees from UC Berkeley, UC Davis, and Stanford present their research. In its various forms, this Training Program has been funded by NIMH for more than 20 years. The program is committed to broad based training, spanning human and non-human models, multiple disciplines, and social / behavioral …

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  • Wed, May 9, 2018, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    A new perspective on the social functions of emotions: Gratitude and the witnessing effect

    Presenter: Christopher Oveis, Assistant Professor, UC San Diego

    We propose a novel theoretical and empirical approach to studying group-level social functions of emotions and use it to make new predictions about social consequences of gratitude. Here, we document the witnessing effect: In social groups, emotional expressions are often observed by 3rd party witnesses—family members, co-workers, friends, and neighbors. Emotional expressions coordinate …

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  • Wed, May 2, 2018, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    Scabs: The Social Suppression of Labor Supply

    Presenter: Supreet Kaur, Assistant Professor of Economics, UC Berkeley

    A distinguishing feature of the labor market is social interaction among co-workers---providing the ingredients for social norms to develop and constrain behavior. We use a field experiment to test whether social norms against accepting wage cuts distort workers' labor supply during periods of unemployment. We partner with 183 existing employers, who offer jobs to 502 randomly-selected …

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  • Wed, Apr 25, 2018, 12:10 pm to 1:15 pm

    5101 Tolman Hall

    Message Intended is Not Message Received: Shame, Stigma, and Disengagement in the Academic Probation Notification Process

    Presenter: Shannon Brady, Postdoctoral Scholar, Stanford University

    An important institutional and societal dilemma is how to notify people when they are not meeting performance or community standards without undermining their motivation and efforts to do so. Focusing on the context of college students being placed on academic probation, I find that college administrators overwhelmingly intend probation to be helpful to and motivating for students but that …

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